Vista school prepares for future with coding program

Vista_school_prepares_for_future_with_coding_program_The_Coast_News_Group_-_2016-02-09_15.33.13This story was reported for The Coast News on Feb. 1, 2016.

Coding. It’s a skill that’s foreign to many but one that children as young as 5 are learning in a Vista school. It’s also a skill that’s in high demand.

In a recent survey on the 25 “best jobs in America” by career website Glassdoor, at least eight jobs required experience in coding. The number of coding jobs is also expected to grow over the next decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Casita Center is just one school in the country that’s preparing the next generation of Americans to fill those jobs. Nearly 600 students in grades kindergarten through fifth grade are learning how to code. The magnet school is home to 25 teachers who teach a curriculum that focuses on demanding subjects like science, technology and math.

Read the full story by clicking on the image to the right or going to thecoastnews.com.

Program readies retiring Marines for manufacturing jobs

Program_readies_retiring_Marines_for_manufacturing_jobs_-_Seaside_Courier_Oceanside_-_2016-01-08_21.03.42This story was reported for Seaside Courier on Nov. 11, 2015.

After serving as a Marine for 18 years, an Oceanside resident now has a taste of what he would like to do once he retires from the U.S. military.

Master Sgt. Charles Spencer, 36, is one of 28 active duty Camp Pendleton Marines who are currently enrolled in a program aimed at giving them the skills needed to enter into the manufacturing sector.

The program by San Diego-based Workshops for Warriors offers certifications in various manufacturing disciplines to members of the military.

Read the full story by clicking on the image to the right or going to seasidecourier.com.

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Dad becomes author with help of autistic son

Dad_becomes_author_with_help_of_autistic_son_-_San_Diego_Uptown_News_-_2014-11-07_11.57.29This story was reported for Uptown News on Nov. 7, 2014.

In 2009, six words changed Rusty Trimble’s life.

“Daddy,” said Andrew, Trimble’s son, “can you write a book?”

It was Andrew’s response to a bath-time puppet show Trimble had put on for him every day. The puppet show, complete with five to 10 different characters, was conceived by Trimble to keep Andrew entertained in the bath and interested in stories.

Adhering to his toddler’s request, Trimble got to work and wrote his first book, “Andrew’s Great Train Adventure,” in just three months at the age of 38.

Read the full story at sduptownnews.com.

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Passion earns Carlsbad teacher regional honor

Passion_earns_Carlsbad_teacher_regional_honor_-_Seaside_Courier_News_-_2014-11-05_14.47.37This story was reported for Seaside Courier on Nov. 4, 2014.

Although Carlsbad teacher Maria Teran-Cruz, 47, always knew she wanted to work with children, her path of discovery was likely far different than many others.

Teran-Cruz escaped civil war in Nicaragua but left with vivid memories.

“My younger years were my happier years,” Teran-Cruz said. “I went to a private Catholic school and all my teachers were nuns. My later years were pretty tough. My country was going through an upheaval. I remember going to bed hearing gunfire at night. It gets to the point where you get desensitized because you’ve already seen the unthinkable…”

She worked alongside her mother, a phlebotomist, at war clinics.

“I saw many terrible things,” she said. “I saw children dying, literally, in front of my eyes.”

Read the full story by clicking on the image to the right.

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Teen walks in graduation after paralyzing snowboarding injury

Teen_walks_in_graduation_after_paralyzing_snowboarding_injury_-_Seaside_Courier_News_-_2014-07-02_09.11.39.pngThis story was reported for Seaside Courier on June 16, 2014.

Miracles are possible. Just ask Cardiff resident Celia Brewer.

It was Feb. 1, 2010 when her son, Spencer Fox, crashed while snowboarding at Brighton, Utah.

“Spencer was faster than I was and went down a cat track,” said Brewer, who works as Carlsbad’s city attorney. “He hit a bump and went straight over the snow bank. I skied down and said, ‘Spencer, Spencer. What hurts?’ He said, ‘Nothing, I can’t feel anything.’”

Later at University Hospital in Salt Lake City, Brewer and her son were told he may never walk again.

Read the full story by clicking on the photo to the right.

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